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About


Take On Payments, a blog sponsored by the Retail Payments Risk Forum of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, is intended to foster dialogue on emerging risks in retail payment systems and enhance collaborative efforts to improve risk detection and mitigation. We encourage your active participation in Take on Payments and look forward to collaborating with you.

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September 27, 2021

Payments Inclusion and Broccoli: Lessons from Parental Incentive

A recent television commercial opens to a scene familiar to most families across America: it's dinner time, broccoli is served, and a child pushes the plate away while an anxious parent coaxes the child to eat it. The child is unhappily resistant for reasons many of us can relate to today, and dinnertime is stressful and frustrating for all.

The ad provides a simple solution: "Potato pay!" exclaims Dad, saying the child will get three potato fries as a reward. The child's face lights up, broccoli is swallowed, chased down by the yummy potatoes, and meal-time tranquility now reigns.

The ad caught my eye as we continue to research payments inclusion efforts for greater financial health. While this simple approach might work on a small scale, such as getting your kids to eat their broccoli, payments choices and behaviors are far more complex.

How do you get people to change their behavior when it comes to trying different or newer payment options? What would help people expand their choices to include these options?

Maybe we need to better identify what the "broccoli” is for those people who could benefit from a well-balanced menu of payment choices. We know that issues such as trust, access, privacy, fees, location, lack of transparency, minimum balance requirements, and other barriers are often cited as reasons why people might stick to cash, a perfectly valid choice. Or they may lead them to use other forms of payments that may be more expensive, such as prepaid cards that come with fees, check cashers, or money transfer facilities.

Rewards, peer and social inclusion, and other positive reinforcements can be useful motivators for behavior change, among other approaches. In general, the reward's promised delight needs to outweigh the refusal to try something, whether it's broccoli to encourage healthy choices, or a payments option that might provide greater financial freedom and health by moving money around more easily and perhaps less expensively.

As we move forward with our payments inclusion research, I will continue to look for incentives that might be helpful for people considering options they might initially not like but could be helpful to their financial health. Meanwhile, I plan to check out the freezer aisle for those magic potatoes.

June 28, 2021

Talk about Payments during the Pandemic—Join Us on July 13

When the conventional wisdom holds true, it still can be a good idea to look under the hood. Sometimes survey data confirm the conventional wisdom. That's the case with new data from the Diary of Consumer Payment Choice, which show that the use of cash for purchases and person-to-person (P2P) payments dropped in 2020. In 2019, cash was used for 31 percent of these payments while in 2020, the pandemic year, the cash share fell to 23 percent.

"Of course," you may say, "I haven't been shopping or paying others in person. And for months, I avoided handing over a payment to a retail clerk. That's why the share of cash fell." I agree, this is a completely obvious point.

Even the obvious, however, contains nuances. That's why the Talk About Payments webinar on July 13 will ask questions about factors that may underlie these data, including the following:

  • What's the impact of remote purchasing on payment instrument choice?
  • Were there generational differences in purchasing behavior in 2020?
  • Fewer consumers carried a balance on their credit cards in 2020. Did that affect purchasing behavior?
  • Are more consumers ready to use payment apps?

I hope you'll join me and Joanna Stavins from the Boston Fed alongside Shaun O'Brien from the Cash Product Office at the San Francisco Fed for the next Talk About Payments webinar, July 13, 2021, at 1 p.m. (ET). We'll chat about not only remote shopping but also other factors that could be affecting the use of cash for purchases and P2P payments.

This webinar is open to the public but you must register in advance to participate. (Registration is free.) You can register onlineOff-site link. Once registered, you will receive a confirmation email with login and call-in information. We hope you will join us on July 13, when you will have an opportunity to ask questions about the results of the research.

June 1, 2021

The Generational Divide in Online Shopping during the COVID Pandemic

Like me, you probably have seen many headlines citing the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on people in various demographic segments. Take, for example, age:

  • "COVID-19 hurts working mothers"
  • "Millenials slammed by second financial crisis"
  • "COVID pushes out women and boomers"
  • "Pandemic accelerates retirements"

As you can see from these headlines, no generation is unscathed.

How did people of different ages behave during COVID? Preliminary data from the 2020 Survey of Consumer Payment Choice appear to show that in 2020, millennials increased their uptake of new payments habits while boomers were slower to do so.

  • Millennials increased their share of online purchases as a percentage of all purchases by a greater margin than boomers. Boomers’ share of purchases online went from 4 percent in 2019 to 6 percent in 2020. For millennials, online purchases jumped to 21 percent from 13 percent.
  • Millennials continued to expand their enthusiastic reception of payment apps, including Venmo and Zelle.

Of course, many factors, not just COVID, are in play here. These could be a few:

  • Millennials are moving into their prime earning years. For example, they became more likely to have a credit card in 2020. Two-thirds of millennials had a credit card in 2019, and almost 8 in 10 did in 2020.
  • Boomers may be stuck in their habits. Payments choice, like many other consumer behaviors, is a habit and generally slow to change.

You can examine differences in consumer behavior by age using the interactive charts for the 2020 Survey of Consumer Payment Choice at atlantafed.org.

May 24, 2021

Mindfulness Can Ease Payments Stressors

Making a $26 purchase recently, I was surprised when my debit card was declined. My account had money in it, so I couldn't understand what was wrong. Fortunately, I had cash and prepared to pay with it. Then, the clerk pointed to a notice taped to the terminal: "No cash accepted."

Behind me, people were growing impatient, sighing, and shuffling their feet. I tried a credit card I keep for emergencies, and it went through. Relieved to complete the purchase, I left and called the bank. My account was fine; the problem was with the merchant's terminal.

Back in my car, I breathed a sigh of relief but thought about how uncomfortable I felt standing in line, having two payment methods rejected, needing to scramble to find another way to pay, and sensing the impatience of others behind me. I also thought about the alarm I felt when my debit card was declined. Had my account been attacked and emptied by fraudsters? I realized this transaction had triggered a typical stress response: increased heart rate, anxious feelings, sweaty palms, disrupted breathing patterns, all physical and emotional reactions to a simple payment transaction that almost wasn't completed.

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, and it helps to be more aware of any stress we have while making our daily payment transactions. We are all affected by money and need it to function in our daily lives. We often take payments for granted but it's our primary method for getting what we need and want. Money, and conflicts over money, are significant stressors for people. One way to help with stress reduction is mindfulnessOff-site link, the practice of bringing your attention to the present moment, taking a deep breath, and relaxingOff-site link. In this situation, I used mindfulness techniques to reduce the physical and emotional effects I was feeling. I was grateful I had learned these techniques for staying calm and reducing my stress response.

I think about people who are having payments rejected for whatever their circumstances, whether it's due to bank error, merchant error, a fraud alert, or the merchant not accepting a payment type such as cash or check. This can be particularly stressful if you need groceries, a prescription, gas, or emergency supplies and can't get them because either you or the merchant can't complete your transaction due to each one's payment choices or available options.

This in-person point of sale issue has the power to affect you in ways you may not even recognize, causing feelings of shame, embarrassment, anger, and anxiety. Payments inclusion initiatives can address some of these issues. In addition, by simply acknowledging that any of the monetary transactions we make in a day can cause stress, we can increase our awareness of how we respond to help us remain calm and reduce mistakes. When we take a deep breath and a minute to be mindful, we can reduce our body's automatic stress response, which benefits us in other areas of our lives.